June 18, 2010

More Why's My Bookbag...

From the Novel Prague by Arthur Philips:
A permanent institution is composed of impermanent humans, and each of them must contribute their very souls, their impermanent and unimportant lives, if the institution is to preserve its immortality.
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Imre marveled at what had happened of its own accord: A purpose could grow over decades without your ever knowing, until the end, when a garden was laid out for you, a garden you helped plan and build without ever knowing it, and it waits for you.

From God and Guinness:
The revered Irish tradition of waking the dead played a role in spreading disease, as well. Routinely, the body of a deceased loved one would lay in the family home for as many as four nights. Meanwhile, the grieving family was expected to provide food, drink, and tobacco for huge crowds of visitors who milled about the dead body and thus exposed themselves to whatever disease had killed the deceased. Making matters worse, this tradition had the tragic side effect of spreading poverty, a condition in which disease thrives. As Tony Corcoran has written in his tender tribute, The Goodness of Guinness, “even for the poorest Dublin family, a four-horse hearse constituted a show of respectability to the community—despite the fact that the family had to borrow...

From The Essential Pope Benedict:
In ancient times the really terrible thing about prisons was that they cut people off from the light of day and plunged them into darkness.
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There is a great temptation to say, “But there is so much suffering in the world!—let’s suspend the question of truth for a while. First let’s get on with the great social tasks of liberation; then, one day, we will indulge in the luxury of the question of truth.” In fact, however, if we postpone the question of truth and declare it to be unimportant, we are emasculating man, depriving him of the very core of his human dignity.
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And in fact, in St. Paul, this sacrament is called “the Lord’s Supper.” But it is significant that this title very soon disappeared, and from the second century it was used no longer. Why? Was it perhaps a moving away from the New Testament, as Luther thought, or something else? Certainly the Lord instituted his sacrament in the context of a meal, more precisely that of the Jewish Passover supper, and so at the beginning it was also linked with a gathering for a meal. But the Lord had not ordered a repetition of the Passover supper, which constituted the framework. That was not his sacrament, his new gift. In any event, the Passover supper could only be celebrated once a year.

4 comments:

mrsdarwin said...

Ah, I see you've put up your family picture again! You look like you haven't aged a day, and your wife is quite a woman to keep your Guinness topped off all the time.

TS said...

:-)

TS said...

Speaking of beer, tomorrow my wife's taking me to a brewery for my birthday!

mrsdarwin said...

Drink one for all of us!