October 16, 2017

Marriage According to a Futurist

Rarely do you see how different the Judeo-Christian instinct is from someone like the futurist guru who came to talk to our corporation recently.

His take was simple materialism: that which does not benefit us in this life should be discarded. Marriage, he says, was an institution designed when people lived to age 25, not to live together for 150 years (when our lifetimes expand to that point, assuming they do).  He said marriage is not tenable any longer because people can't be expected to live together that long.

Marriage has always been hard, at least going back to Moses’s time. But marriage, like water, isn’t an end in itself. Most people view water as simply something that enabled life on this planet. But you could view it as having been created by God expressly for the sacrament of Baptism - i.e. eternal life - and in order to symbolize its life-giving properties God made it earthly-life-giving as well.

In other words, water’s function as thirst-quencher is a byproduct of water’s role in Baptism rather than the other way around.  We view the spiritual as negligible, the earthly as all important while God does the opposite.

Similarly, with marriage. It’s meant to signify God’s relationship with us. The prophet Isaiah wrote that “your creator will marry you”. And that’s partially the significance of Sunday's gospel about heaven being a “wedding feast”. The point of marriage is less that it’s an end in itself but a pointer to the true marriage, the eternal one, with God. The permanence of earthly love in marriage is meant to show the permanence of the love God has for us. Without that pattern we are left much the poorer for it.

Ultimately God really wants us to mirror Him so we can show Him to others. Often I don’t like this much, preferring he show Himself to others (and myself) directly. Cut out the middlemen. But that’s obviously not God’s plan given that Jesus said to Paul on the road to Damascus, ‘Why are you persecuting me?”.  But what I miss is that it's not Pelagian; God gives us the grace for marriage or to mirror Him.

But if your supposition is that God doesn’t exist or is an impersonal Spirit, then you may be left with scratching your head thinking marriage is inexplicable, assuming you ignore the toll divorce takes on kids.

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There is something about Eucharistic Adoration on Thursday that sets me up to better appreciate Communion in the following day or two. The one Host, in the gaudy monstrance, drives home the reality of the One Bread. To look at it from a distance, seemingly unattainable or untouchable in its glass protection, makes me realize the generousness of Sundays. Unless something is withheld from us for awhile perhaps we can’t appreciate the gift.

2 comments:

Kevin Hammer said...

Unrelated, just passing along- Toledo Museum exhibit, Treasures of Early Christian Art: http://www.toledomuseum.org/exhibitions/glorious-splendor/

TS said...

Thanks for the tip Kevin!